myth and poetry
 

mythopoetry Scholar

 

Annual Reflections In Depth Perspectives
Mythopoetry Scholar vol.3 2012
Revolution: the act of turning again
-Richard Lance Williams

1.
you wake up
—thud—
unarm
the night
(it could be
the murder of
your last dream)
& the world
smells like
piss—
a thick
sludge of
orange
butter
piss—
you check
your sheets
the commode
the tank the couch
the cat box the fridge
the garbage can
the backdoor
front door
tool shed
garage
washer
dryer
car
bicycle
Segway
the woodpile
& then you hit
the TV remote
ah! there
it is—
the world
will end with
everybody pissed
off at everybody else
de-evolution is televised
there’s your apocalypse fire
your sweet comeuppance
doesn’t it feel great
to show all those
self-righteous
pricks how
it felt to
put up
with
all
their
shit for
all those
goddamned
motherfucking
years fuck shit cunt

2.
who are you—Bret Easton
Ellis
—does anybody remember
him or who cares shooting bullets
at schools of stink drawing
diagrams of the human
female reproductive
organs—staining
silk shirts with
movie squibs
of ketchup
& Karo
or clearly
the mystery genre
simulates our search
for who we are—incidents
we have forgotten—secrets—
the blanks—define us more than
what we clearly remember—
we are each detectives
good & bad ones
intermittently—
but we are
all confabulists
filling in the gaps
with bullshit & beauty

3.
early 20th century
artists disassembled
the world—Schoenberg
Nijinsky Picasso Eliot Joyce
blew it up—fractured the narrative
& you get Julian Schnabel
with his godawful pots
& beautiful films
—a shit can
become
gold—
you
say: it
works—this
Rube Goldberg
contraption of disparity
this conflagration of piss &
shit—glass bellied blueprints
of “the bride stripped bare
by her bachelors, even

left to be covered in
dust by the chess
master Marcel
Duchamp

4.
& you gave up
on Castaneda
when he hung
you in a barn
saying you
could not
be free
until
you
could
remember
every detail of
your life & you knew
it was your dreams
that held you
hostage to
the fire
where
be
Swift
Gulliver
with his
huge hose
(control this
R. Mutt laughed
an all-white urinal
the sign of the times)
your youngest daughter
calls asking who was that
woman with the high IQ who
was more famous for her breasts
the one who died in a car crash literally
losing her head—Jayne Mansfield
man’s field—it is not irony
how you gave up on
cigarettes sugar
alcohol & red
meat but
not on
lying
(o Hermes
does Zeus even
know, most clever
of usurpers—media
master—the revolution
will be advertised
1/2 off the top
it’s a fire sale—
Ash Wed.”
T.S. had
it wrong
except
about
cats
boys
setting
them on fire
cruel little bastards
Lt. Calley Nero Jehovah
Sherman whoever ordered
the Dresden bombing the ovens
of Dachau the crosses KKK
all those stars up there
waiting to burn out
this fabric of
emptiness
& the garden
of Eden guarded
by a flaming sword
when the executioners
push a man to the wall
they don’t order “shoot
Lennon singing “You say
you want a revolution

. . . you’d better free
your mind instead”
but you see
what that
got him
& we
all got
it coming

said the joker
to the Big Chief
burn that mother down
—disco inferno—
& who reads
beyond
Dante’s
first book

with Lucifer
a black baste
embedded in ice
the rosy fingers of
a Nagasaki nightmare
turn around & she’s a young
girl going out—her hair on fire
singing along with John Lydon
“Anger is an energy” —light a fire
in the watchtower Agamemnon
is home & Clytemnestra is
not happy—o regicide
Prometheus lost his
liver & the gods
are pissed
I am the god
of hell fire & i bring you
. . . ”
the world turned upside down

o Copernicus, you’ve made of god a liar



Notes: “Wake up” is a call in The Jehovah’s Witness pamphlet The Watchtower. T.S. Eliot “Ash Wednesday” based on Dante’s Purgatorio has the refrain “Because I do not hope to turn” while his “The Hollow Men” concludes with the famous whimpering end of the world. “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” is a 1970 poem and song by Gil Scott-Heron. While decrying the commercialization of everything, his was a plea for a revolution in the heart. The Hopi and other Native Americans have a prophecy that the world will end in fire. “Fuck shit cunt piss” are the first of George Carlin’s seven incendiary words not to be uttered on television (in the public place of discourse). Motherfucker is another of the words. Bret Easton Ellis wrote Less Than Zero, a nihilist novel famous for its casual moral emptiness. You never read it. Robert Downey Jr was in the film version playing the heroically emptiest of characters. The reaction to his death belied the nihilist pose as mere fashion. His literary pal Jay McInerney was famous for the use of second person in the novel Bright Lights, Bright City. The early 20th century saw fracturing as its main theme in art and culture— from Einstein’s relativity to Cubism to 12-tone music to “The Wasteland” to Finnegan’s Wake, narrative was revolutionized. Julian Schnabel gained notice for large paintings whose chief substrate consisted of broken ceramic plates. He was more successful as a film director. “The bride stripped bare by her bachelors, even” usually referred to as “The Large Glass” is a large assemblage on glass. It cracked but Duchamp made use of the cracks in his repair. He incorporated dust into it while it lay in his studio the eight years it took to complete. He spent his latter years playing chess, creating art in secret. Carlos Castaneda’s The Eagle's Gift, 1981. Prometheus had his liver pulled out day after day by an eagle for stealing fire from the gods. Firewater is a term purportedly used by Native Americans to describe whiskey. The Gaelic term for whiskey is usquebaugh, meaning the water of life. Alcoholism does damage to the liver. In Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, the titular protagonist outrages the Lilliputians putting out a fire by urinating on it. Marcel Duchamp outraged the art world in 1917 with his “Fountain,” a urinal signed R. Mutt. Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” combined with the famous red covered Big Chief tablets. The Trammps 1978 disco hit. A famous commercial in the 1960s for Kodak used the song “Turn Around” with the lyrics “turn around and she’s a young girl going out on her own.” John Lydon’s “Rise” begins with the refrain, “May the road rise with you.” To be pissed is English slang for being inebriated. English band The Crazy World of Arthur Brown’s only hit was “Fire,” released in 1968, a year of revolution. At the Yorktown surrender of the British to the American revolutionaries, the tune played was “The World Turned Upside Down.” Empedocles posits four elements. Heraclitus considered fire the fundamental element: “All things are an interchange for fire, and fire for all things, just like goods for gold and gold for goods.” (Diels-Kranz B90 (Freeman [1948] 1970, p. 45).) The term revolution was first used in politics in England in 1688-89, to describe the overthrow of James II in favor of William III and Mary II (from Richard Pipes; see http://chagala.com/russia/pipes.htm)



2014 Shorty Award in #mythopoetics

Nominated in the community generated category #mythopoetics, Revolution: the act of turning again, a part of the top ten nominated pages from this issue, finishes competition on 2/18/14 with an overall standing in position ***37*** among more than 3,500 nominees. Congratulations to Richard (Lance) Scow-Williams on this fine achievement.


*** **** ****** *** **** **** Mythopoetry Scholar, vol. thre 2012  bottom logo**** *** ****** *** **** ***

Richard lance Williams

Richard Lance Williams (Ric Williams)
received his master’s degree in mythology with an emphasis in depth psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute in 1998. Ric has edited the Litera listings of The Austin Chronicle since 1988. Ric also wrote the “Poet’s Beat” column (interviews with local poets) for The Austin Light from 1987-1991. He edited for Ed Buffalo’s poetry anthologies Aileron and Vowel Movement in the late 80’s and early 90’s and was the associate editor from 1997-1999 for Alchemy on Sunday, the literary journal of Pacifica Graduate Institute. In 2006 he became the senior editor for Dalton Publishing. Ric has written and/or edited for the Austin Chronicle, Man! Magazine, and the Salt Journal. His interview with Larry McMurtry is included in Conversations with Texas Writers, published in March 2005 by UT Press.


Publications:

Secret Book of God
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poetry, 104 pages, soft cover
bookstore price: $14.95

December 2007 - Robert Bonazzi, critically acclaimed author and Poetic Diversity Columnist for the San Antonio Express-News, announced Ric Williams’ the secret book of god as the best book of poetry by a living Texas poet in his 2007 Poetic Diversity Awards. These awards intend to bring recognition to significant books that have been overlooked. Previous winners of the Poetry in Texas award are Paul Christensen (Hard Country, Thorp Springs Press) and Naomi Shihab Nye (You & Yours, BOA Editions, Ltd.).


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Woman In The Tower: Stories for the Wounded Child
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read what people are saying about this book

Fiction, 200 Pages, Hard Cover
Bookstore Price $19.95

Richard Lance Williams reads from His novel:
WOMAN IN THE TOWER
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website: ricwilliams.com



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